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Cedar Waxwings & American Robins
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Elizabeth Miklavcic

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It snowed heavily for two days in April dumping over a foot covering the ground on April 4 and 5, 2023. Migrating flocks of Cedar Waxwings and Robins found a food source when they showed up on the second day of the storm and began feasting on Crabapple berries that were abundant on our tree. They stayed for two days and then continued on their migration path. I took the opportunity to photograph them as they filled their bellies. I observed a few tossing the berry into the air to help them swallow the sometimes too big fruit for their throats. Many times they struggled, and a lot of the berries landed on the ground, but they were able to replenish and rest before moving onward. I enjoyed the challenge of photographing these beautiful songbirds and it was a pleasure spending time observing their behavior. The Latin Name for Cedar Waxwings is Bombycilla Cedrorum.

The American Robin is one of North America's most familiar and widespread songbirds. It is a member of the thrush family, a gray bird with a dark head and distinguished by an orange or red breast. For centuries the Robin as been the symbol of good luck, happiness, and rebirth. Its Latin name is Turdus Migratorius.

I've read two completely opposite accounts, the first is that Cedar Waxwings and American Robins get along, whereas the other account stated that they are enemies and Robins will chase off the Waxwings. It is reported that they are common traveling partners in the fall and winter. Cedar Waxwings are social birds year round, but the American Robins become territorial in the spring during nesting season., which would explain the divergent behavioral accounts.

My observation over the two days in April 2023 was that they were very comfortable with each other and that both species were focused on filling their bellies with Crabapple fruit before the flocks continued on to their destinations.

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